Why Does My Air Conditioner Run All Day?

5 Reasons That May Be Causing Your Air Conditioner To Run Constantly

No one dreads an energy bill like a Floridian in the Summer! That’s because we know the high temperatures outside can make it harder to keep it cool indoors – but what’s normal and what is not for how long your air conditioner should be running?

On a normal Summer day, even in the 90s, your air conditioner should be run for about 15 minutes per cycle and have about 2 to 3 cycles per hour. However, if your air conditioning system has a cycle that runs for 30 minutes, an hour, or just doesn’t seem to stop and runs all day, then your air conditioner might just have something wrong with it.

Ignoring the issue, or waiting too long to take care of it, will only cause you a bigger headache in the long run. First, when you see your monthly energy bill and then when it completely breaks down from overuse and needs far more serious repairs.

Here are 5 reasons that may be causing your air conditioner to run all day:

  1. Its actually too small for your home and can’t keep up. You may wonder how that could happen – shouldn’t the right size have been installed in the first place? Normally, yes. However, industry recommendations change over time; what may have been considered a good size 10 years ago may not be any more. Or it could be that the previous home owner didn’t want to shell out the money for the right size or the previous HVAC technician didn’t do the job correctly. Whatever the case, have your system reviewed to see if the size is causing your issue.
  2. Your air conditioner is too old and it can’t keep up. Just like people age and find that they are no longer as limber or energetic as they once were, your air conditioner also has stages of life. Most systems last only 12-15 years and typically after 10, they may struggle to keep up with cooling demands in their “old” age.
  3. You home is draftier than you knew. Leaks throughout your home – along windows, doorways, in the attic, or even in the ductwork can let some of that cool air out – leaving your air conditioner to work that much harder to replace that cold air.
  4. Your thermostat is set too low. In order to keep up with cooling demands, your thermostat will need to be set to a reasonable temperature range. If it’s a scorching 98 degree day out with no cloud coverage in site (and of course, a high humidity index) and you have your thermostat set to 68 degrees then your air conditioner is going to have to work overtime and run constantly to maintain that 30 degree difference. Try bumping the thermostat up 5 degrees and turn on ceiling fans to help keep your home cool.
  5. Your ac system has dirty coils. You may not know to check the coils or even how to, but with routine annual maintenance this issue can be avoided. The coils are what cool the air and if they are dirty, then it will be harder for them to do their job – which means your air conditioner will run longer to cool the air as required.

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