How Your AC Works

There is hardly any building or car without an air conditioner these days. It has become a useful component of houses, homes, vehicles, and so on. With each passing day, air conditioning is becoming more and more of a necessity.  Although everyone enjoys a cool room, not all know how the air is cooled. While this may seem like something only a professional air conditioning repair company like EasyBreezy AC may need to know – understanding how something works will help you identify any issues that arise and whether they can be simple DIY AC fixes or require professional AC repair.

Parts Of An Air Conditioning Unit

To understand how an air conditioner works, you’ll need to know the four major components of an air conditioner. These parts are:

  1. Evaporator

The evaporator collects heat from a space via a refrigerant gas. The evaporator coils are where the absorption of heat by the liquid refrigerant takes place, and after the absorption process, the liquid evaporates into a gas.

An additional function of the evaporator coil is to dehumidify the room by drawing out moisture from the incoming hot air.

  1. Compressor

As the name suggests, this is the area in which the compression of the gaseous refrigerant occurs. By increasing the pressure of the gas, the temperature rises. The gas is the transferred to the condenser for conversion.

  1. Condenser

This is where the gas refrigerant is converted back to liquid, and the heat I absorbed from the air is expelled outside.

  1. Expansion Valve

The valve is positioned between the cooling coils of the evaporator and the hot coils of the condenser. Sometimes referred to as the throttling device, it monitors the amount of refrigerant that moves into the evaporator.

How An Air Conditioner Works

When you turn on an air conditioner and select your desired temperature, there is a sensory device in the AC that senses whether there is a difference between the temperature of the room and the one selected by you.

If there is, then warm air is taken into the air conditioning system through an intake vent, typically located at the base of the indoor unit or in a central part of your home. Some homes have multiple intake vents. The warm air then follows through your ducts and over the evaporator coils containing the liquid refrigerant. The refrigerant absorbs the heat from the air and turns into hot gas.

The hot refrigerant gas is sent to the compressor which is on the unit installed outside. The gas is compressed, further increasing the gas’s temperature.

The now high-temperature, high-pressured compressed refrigerant gas is then transferred to the condenser which cools the hot gas back into a liquid. The heat of the gas is released into the open air through metal fins in your outdoor part of the AC unit.

The liquid travels through an expansion valve and back into the evaporator as a cool liquid refrigerant. The air passes over the evaporator coils and cools before being blown back into you’re your home.

The process is repeated until the desired temperature is achieved.

If you want more orientation or you want to request a service, please do not hesitate to contact us to receive more information about it!



The History And Evolution Of Our Modern Air Conditioning Systems

Here in Florida we have been in the throws of Fall and most of us are still turning to our air conditioners to combat the scorching temperatures and unbearable humidity. Humans going to great lengths to stay cool is not a new concept, but the air conditioners we use to keep cool today are relatively new concepts.

This modern invention that we have become so reliant upon today was named one of the top 10 achievements of the 20th century by the National Academy of Engineering in 2000. Here we look at how technology evolved from humans simply sweating and fanning themselves to developing the modern air conditioning systems we have grown to love today.

The Father Of Modern Air Conditioning

In 1902, engineer Willis Haviland Carrier was hired by the Sacekt-Wilhelms Lithographing and Publishing Company in Brooklyn, NY to solve an interesting problem – the papers of the magazines were wrinkling because of the high humidity within the company’s printing plant. Carrier immediately gets to work conducting several tests and experiments and invents the “Apparatus for Treating Air”, a machine that blows warm air over cold coils to cool the room temperature and control the humidity within the room. Carrier’s invention successfully decreases the temperature and humidity within the printing plant, keeping the pages from wrinkling and the ink properly aligned. Carrier was granted a patent for his new technology, and as he saw the need within other industries for his cooling equipment he moved on from his role with Sacekt-Wilhelms Lithographing and Publishing Co. and established Carrier Engineering Corporation, later becoming the Carrier Air Conditioning Company of America, now the largest air conditioner manufacturer in the world.

The Carrier Air Conditioning Company continued to make advances in the technology used within their cooling systems, and popularity of commercial use of artificial air conditioning systems began to spread with the use of air conditioners in movie theaters across the county. This is where the public began to become exposed to the use of an air conditioner system to cool the air inside, but the size, expense, and harsh chemicals used within these early systems still made them good only for commercial use and not for private use within homes. Because of his work, Willis Carrier is known as the father of modern air conditioning.

Bringing Air Conditioning Into Our Homes

As use of the Carrier air conditioning system continued to gain popularity commercially, many people sought methods to reduce the size and cost of the machines to be able to make air conditioning residentially available within our homes. Using the existing technology, Frigidaire created a split-room cooler system in 1929 that was finally small enough to be used inside a home. Unfortunately, this system was still quite expensive. Frank Faust, an engineer at General Electric, later improved the Frigidaire design by creating the self-contained cooler room. General Electric then went on to create 32 other similar models between 1930 and 1931.

Then, in 1931 H.H. Schultz and J.Q. Sherman invent a portable, individual room air conditioning unit that can sit on the ledge of a window. The window ac units become publicly available for sale a year later, but still are only able to be enjoyed among the wealthy. It isn’t until 1947 that these window ac units begin to lower in cost and become widely available throughout the U.S. The use of these window units continues to spread and gain popularity throughout the 1940s and 1950s until new homes began to be built with central air conditioning systems in the 1960s. According to the Energy Information Administration, today about 87% of all Americans have some form of air conditioning in their homes.

With many thanks being due to the early inventors and scientists who relentlessly pursued finding the solution to cooling our indoor spaces during the scorching hot summers, we now are all able to enjoy comfortable temperatures indoors all year round. Contact EasyBreezy A/C today to discuss the cooling solutions we have available for your home!



How To Stay Cool When Your AC Breaks Down

We are now in the full heat of summer, and it seems like an air conditioning break down always happens during the hottest part of summer or right before you are having out of town guests coming to visit. When your AC breaks down during the busiest time of year it can be difficult to get an available tech from EasyBreezy to come out to your house right away, and sometimes you might have to wait a few days before someone is able to come out and help. There is nothing more frustrating than having to battle the heat and humidity in a stuffy home with no AC, but luckily you don’t have to lose your cool just because your AC is broken. Here are some creative ways to help you stay cool when your AC breaks down:

 

  1. Reduce Heat Generated Within Your Home

    The first step to keeping your home cool with a broken AC is to reduce the amount of heat you are producing within your home. While you probably don’t realize it when your AC is working, everyday appliances us a lot of energy and produce a lot of heat when they are using this energy. Of course, you want to try to avoid cooking with heat by not using your stove or oven, but if you must cook with heat try to do so with a microwave, toaster oven, or crock pot. You should also be careful using other appliances in your home like your dryer and dishwasher, which also produce heat. Finally, minimize the use of technology and electricity in your home by using the fewest lights possible and not watching TV or playing on the computer. For the lights in your home that you must use, try using more energy efficient light bulbs as they will also produce the least amount of heat.

  2. Use Fans Wisely

    One of the most obvious things to do when your AC breaks down is to turn on all the fans in your home. But in order for this to actually help keep you cool, you need to understand how fans actually work. Fans do not do anything to keep a room cool, but they do make you feel cooler because of the effect of air moving over your body and evaporation. If you are using a ceiling fan, make sure the blades are moving counter-clockwise to push air downward off the ceiling and create a breeze. During the day increase the efficiency of the fan by placing a bowl of ice in front of the fan, the fan will pick up the cool air as the ice melts and evaporates creating a cooling mist effect as the fan oscillates air through the room. At night if it is cooler outside you can open a window and put the fan in front of the window to draw in the cool air from outside.

  3. Use Your Freezer (The Right Way)

    When we say to use your freezer the right way we definitely do not mean to leave your freezer door open to try to keep the room cool. Unfortunately, we have seen many people try to do this in a last-ditch effort of desperation to keep cool, but not only is it extremely inefficient for your freezer, it could also lead to mechanical problems with your freezer later on. What we do mean is to use your freezer creatively by freezing a couple washcloths or hand towels and maybe even your bedsheets. You can use the washcloths and hand towels to wrap around cooling points across your body (around your neck, wrists, and feet) which will help keep your body temperature down. And placing your sheets in the freezer before you go to bed will help keep your entire body nice and cool when you do get ready to lay down for the night.

  4. Take A Cold Shower

    One of the quickest ways to cool your own body temperature down is to take a nice cold shower. Taking a cold shower will help drop you body temperature immediately. Once you are done with the shower you might not want to completely dry off right away. You can put your clothes on and let them soak up the water, by wearing clothes that are slightly damp your body will be able to maintain a lower body temperature a lot more easily. Keeping your hair wet after the shower and letting it air dry is also a great way to help keep your body temperature done naturally for hours.

Now that you know how to stay cool until you can get your AC running again, contact EasyBreezy A/C today! Whether you are looking to repair a broken AC system or completely replace an old worn out system with a new one, we have the cooling solutions you need!



Early Attempts Of Air Conditioning Systems

Before scientists and inventors began experimenting to find artificial means to cooling the air, humans relied heavily on the natural process of sweating and some form of fanning themselves to keep cool during scorching Summer months. In ancient Egypt, the Egyptians would hang wet reeds in the windows of their homes and other buildings to use the water’s evaporation to cool their spaces.

Similarly, in ancient Rome, Romans diverted water from their cities aqueducts through the walls of buildings to create a cooling effect. In the 3rd century, Emperor Elagabalus used more than 1,000 slaves to import snow, building his own mountain of snow in the garden next to his home to keep him cool during the summer.

Inventors and scientists began to get involved in the concept of artificial cooling when Chinese inventor Ding Huan invented the first manually powered rotary fan during the 2nd century. It wasn’t then until the 17th century when Englishman Cornelius Drebbel discovered that adding salt to water cooled the air when the water evaporated. Both John Hadley, a Cambridge University Chemistry professor, and Benjamin Franklin, acclaimed American inventor, continued to experiment with the use of evaporation of other liquids to cool and freeze different objects around 1758.

Using Climate Cooling To Prevent Disease And Make Patients Comfortable

The concept of the necessity of cooling cities began right here in Florida when physician and inventor, Dr. John Gorrie, believing that cooling cities was essential to relieving local residents of “the evils of high temperatures”, began experimenting with the concept of artificial cooling in the 1840s. Dr. Gorrie believed that properly controlling climate temperature was the key to preventing diseases like malaria, and making sick patients more comfortable, thereby making it easier for their bodies to heal.

Dr. Gorrie’s first system of cooling required ice to be shipped to Florida from frozen lakes throughout the north. This clearly caused an expensive logistical challenge to making proper cooling readily accessible, so Dr. Gorrie set out to create a system to cool the air in hospital rooms using an engine powered by a horse, water, and wind-driven sails or steam to pull in air, compress it, and then running cooler air back out through pipes.

When the pipes on his machine unexpectedly froze and began to develop ice, Dr. Gorrie realized there could be another use for his machine and received a patent in 1851 for his unique technology in the first ice machine. However, Dr. Gorrie was not ever able to successfully bring his ice machine to the marketplace.

In the summer of 1881 when U.S. President James Garfield was shot twice by an assassin, naval engineers came together to build a similar ice machine cooling system to keep him cool and comfortable. This new device was filled with cloths soaked in water and used a fan to blow hot air overhead and keep the cooler air closer to the ground.

Incredibly the device can lower the temperature in his room by 20 degrees Fahrenheit, from 95 degrees down to a much more comfortable 75 degrees! Unfortunately, the device required an extreme amount of ice to operate, consuming more than a half-million pounds of ice in only two months.

The modern air conditioning system was developed by engineer Willis Haviland Carrier in the 1900s. Since then design and efficiency have improved, but the general idea of cooling rooms is still quite desirable, especially for Florida residents.

Now that you know how were the early attempts of AC systems, contact EasyBreezy A/C today! Whether you are looking to repair a broken AC system or completely replace an old worn out system with a new one, we have the cooling solutions you need!



How To Prepare Your HVAC Unit To Survive Hurricane Season

Anyone who lives in Florida is no stranger to hurricane season and the other severe weather such as tornadoes, tropical storms, and thunderstorms that we are all subject to. And while the Tampa Bay area has not been directly hit by a hurricane since 1921, according to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Tampa Bay area is one of the top five most vulnerable cities to hurricanes, and many experts estimate that the Tampa Bay area is well overdue for a direct hit, and even unnamed storms have been known to be severe enough to leave behind damage. It may seem like we are in hurricane season year-round at times, but hurricane seasons really runs from June 1 to November 30 each year.

While keeping our families safe is our top priority when severe weather threatens our area, we also can take precautions to ensure our homes are prepared to withstand the damage of a storm. We already know we need to stock up on sandbags to protect our doors and homes from flooding, and to board up our windows, but did you know there are also steps you should take to prepare your HVAC system ahead of a storm? Read on to find out what you should be doing to care for your HVAC unit before, during, and after a major storm.

RISKS SEVERE WEATHER POSES TO OUR AC UNITS

It is impossible for us to properly prepare for any major storm if we don’t understand the risks that are associated with the storm. Hurricanes and other major storms pose many risks to our HVAC units including:

Flood Damage

our HVAC systems are designed to withstand normal weather conditions, but not extreme weather conditions that bring an extreme amount of rain and flooding waters with them. This excess water can submerge our equipment and damage it beyond repair.

Wind Damage

high winds pose a couple different threats to our HVAC system. High winds can cause pieces of our HVAC equipment to become dislodged, and can also cause trees, electrical poles, and other flying debris to land on our systems and cause damage.

Lightning Damage

lightning poses the threat of striking and causing electrical damage to our HVAC systems, just like it can do to any other electrical equipment.


WHAT TO DO BEFORE THE STORM?

Use the following tips to prepare your HVAC system for a major storm before it arrives:


Keep Your Unit Maintained

proper maintenance to your HVAC system is important for many reasons, including keeping it well prepared to withstand the harsh conditions a major storm will bring with it. Having your HVAC system properly checked and maintained by a qualified HVAC professional is imperative to preparing your system for any potential risks well before a storm.

Anchor Your Unit

having your HVAC equipment properly installed and anchored is pivotal in protecting it from damage during a major storm. Once you know your HVAC unit is properly installed, you can also secure it with hurricane straps or metal braces to further secure it for threats posed by major storms.

Elevate Your Unit

if it is possible, place your HVAC unit on a higher platform and elevate it to protect it from potential flooding and water damage.

Clean Up Around Your Unit

look all around your HVAC unit and check for any loose items such as toys, plants, loose and dead tree limbs, and any other loose items that could be potential flying debris hazards.

Cover Your Unit

once you have cleared your HVAC system of any existing debris and cleaned up around your HVAC unit, use a nylon or vinyl tarp to cover your unit or cover it by surrounding it with plywood to further protect it from any potential flying debris during the storm.

Cool Your Home Before The Storm

major storms are known to cause large power outages, and during the storm you should be cutting the power to your HVAC unit off, so it is wise to cool your home by setting the thermostat slightly lower than you normally would to help keep your home cool a bit longer once the unit is off.

WHAT TO DO AFTER THE STORM?

Once the storm has passed careful inspection of your unit is important before you make any decisions on what to do moving forward. Remove any debris that has fallen on your HVAC unit and clear the area around your unit. If your HVAC unit or home has been affected by flooding water, or if you suspect your system may have any other damage, you need to have the HVAC unit professionally inspected before you turn it back on. Once your HVAC system has been properly inspected and cleared, it is important to turn it back on as soon as possible to help dry the inside of the home and limit mold from getting into your HVAC system or ductwork.

Contact EasyBreezyA/C today for your annual HVAC check-up to ensure your system is running the way it should be and is prepared to withstand any threats posed to it throughout the rest of hurricane season! We are also available for post-storm inspections if your HVAC unit has recently been exposed to severe weather and you suspect damage.



HVAC Fact VS Fiction

Debunking The Most Common HVAC Myths People Actually Believe

It seems like anywhere you look there is a ton of information available on your HVAC system, how to properly maintain it, and how to get the most efficient use out of it. But how do you know what is and is not accurate? Don’t worry, there’s no need to sweat over it! We’re looking at the most common myths people believe about HVAC systems and separating fact from fiction to make sure what you believe about keeping your HVAC system properly maintained, efficiently running, and long lasting isn’t just full of hot air.

Myth # 1 – You Only Have To Change Your Air Filter Once A Year

How this one even became such a well believed myth we aren’t sure. Over time your HVAC’s air filter naturally gets filled with dirt and dust, and this dirt and dust will cause your air filter to get clogged and your system to run inefficiently if the air filters are not changed out regularly. When your air filter is clogged, both your air flow and air quality will be reduced. You should check your air filter monthly and change it as necessary, at a minimum you should be changing your air filter every few months (at least 4 times a year)! There are some higher end air filters you can purchase that will not require you to change them as frequently but can be regularly cleaned instead.

Myth # 2 – You Only Need To Call A HVAC Professional If You Have A Problem

This myth is easy (and convenient) to believe because of the old adage “if it’s not broke, don’t fix it.” But there is a lot more that a HVAC professional can do other than replacing or repairing an HVAC system. Your HVAC system is a complex mechanical system that requires regular maintenance and tune-ups. Regularly maintaining your HVAC system can give your system a longer lifespan and save you money in major repair costs down the road. At a minimum you should have your HVAC system professionally checked and maintained once a year, but twice a year is recommended.

Myth # 3 – The Larger The HVAC System, The Better It Will Work

This is one of the most easily believed myths out there about HVAC systems. It’s easy to believe that bigger means better. But in reality, when it comes to HVAC systems you need the system that is just the right size for the conditions in your home. If your system is too small for your home then it won’t be able to get your home to a comfortable temperature, but if it is too large for your home then it will cause the system to consistently cycle on and off which will end up costing you more money in energy costs and shortens the lifespan of your unit.

Myth # 4 – It Doesn’t Matter Where My Thermostat Is Located

One of the most important factors to ensuring your HVAC system consistently runs as efficiently as possible is making sure you have proper placement of your thermostat. The placement of your thermostat is important because it reads the temperature surrounding it to make sure your HVAC system is running at the right time to keep the temperature where you want it. If your thermostat is placed too close to appliances, electronics, radiators, and windows it might misread the temperature in the room and cause your system to continually turn on and off or to continue running longer than it needs to. The ideal placement for your thermostat will be on an interior wall in a room that you and your family use frequently.

Myth # 5 – Adjusting The Thermostat As High Or As Low As Possible Will Make The HVAC System Heat Or Cool The Room Faster

Many people believe that the higher or lower the temperature is set on the thermostat, the harder the HVAC system will work to achieve that temperature at a faster pace. The temperature that is set on the thermostat does not do anything other than tell your HVAC system what temperature you want your home heated or cooled to. Adjusting the thermostat temperature all the way up or all the way down will not make your HVAC system working any harder or any faster to achieve that temperature, which ultimately means your system will just run longer because it has to go further up or down than necessary.

It is great to know how to use your HVAC system to maximize efficiency, but you also need to make sure you know when to call a professional. If your HVAC system needs a regular maintenance check, a repair, or even a replacement, trust the certified professionals at EasyBreezy A/C! Call us today to schedule your next HVAC maintenance appointment!



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