Dirty Sock Syndrome Part 2

As we saw in Part 1, Dirty Sock Syndrome is caused by bacterial and fungal growth on the evaporator coil. In this article, we will discuss how to treat prevent the problem.

So, you have Dirty Sock Syndrome. Now What?

The good news is that there are ways you can fix dirty sock syndrome and enjoy high-quality indoor air.

Cleaning is your first remedy. You will need to do a thorough cleaning of the evaporator coils to get rid of mold and bacteria living inside as well as stop your house from smelling like an old gym bag. Use cleaning products along with gloves and wear clothes you don’t mind getting messy. Although, a DIY job is only recommended to those who have sufficient knowledge and proper tools.

Otherwise, call in a professional to do the work on your behalf. The HVAC professionals at EasyBreezy AC will first diagnose the problem and then clean the coil and drain pan. Specialists make use of non-acid or low-acid cleaners to effectively kill mold while not damaging the subtle inner workings of your AC unit. Book an appointment with a trusted air conditioning company now to treat your Dirty Sock Syndrome. Don’t forget to have regular maintenance and inspections scheduled once or twice a year to prevent further issues from happening.

You should also consider coating the drain pans and coils. The coating material should contain an antibacterial agent which prevents regrowth of mold. While the antimicrobial coating is effective, it is still imperative to keep your coils clean as possible because the buildup of organic material produces a base for mold and mildew to grow. Doing so will assure smooth performance of your air conditioning.

If any of these measures do not prove to be highly effective for you, then it is time to replace the coils and maintain them to ensure the problem won’t return. You have to take into account your unit’s age, though. If it is already fairly old (12+ years), it may just be time to get a whole new unit.

How to Treat Dirty Sock Syndrome

  1. Choose a high-quality air conditioning filter

    Bacteria, mold, and mildew need porous substances to grow. Get rid of them from the air before they get in your coils.

  2. Use a whole home air purifier

    They prove to be an excellent aid in killing mold and bacteria. Here at EasyBreezy A/C, we recommend cold plasma ionizers. They are especially ideal for people with compromised immune system, asthma, or allergy problems. A UV light is another option we can provide (though we prefer non-ozone producing IAQ products).

  3. Hire a professional to clean your coil

    While you can perform basic cleaning all alone, it is far better to team up with a professional for help. They will have special cleaners available to them that are designed to clean evaporator coils.

Prevention is Key!

Your AC unit is one of the biggest investments you can make for your home. Don’t let dirty sock syndrome give you so much stress. Early prevention is your best solution.

How to prevent Dirty Sock Syndrome?

1. Keeping up with the routine maintenance of your air conditioner is one of the best ways to prevent all sorts of problems with your AC.
2. Change your air filters regularly. If your filter tends to get dirty quickly, then there may be another problem with your system.
3. Installing a whole home indoor air quality (IAQ) product, like the Phenomenal Aire, will dramatically help reduce and prevent bacteria, fungus, and mold growth in your home.

No matter what the season is, it is always important to make sure your air conditioning unit is working efficiently and not converting into an ideal ground for dirty sock syndrome.

Last modified on March 20th, 2020 at 8:43 pm

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